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Handling complex divorce and family law cases in the Tampa Bay Area, including, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Tampa, and New Port Richey
Handling complex divorce and family law cases in the Tampa Bay Area, including, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Tampa, and New Port Richey

How long do alimony payments last in Florida?

On Behalf of | Dec 14, 2021 | Alimony |

Couples may wonder how long their alimony payments will last in Florida. Ultimately, the answer depends on the facts of the case, but there are a few general guidelines.

Who usually pays alimony in Florida?

Under Florida law, the court can award alimony payments to divorcing parties who cannot support themselves without the help of their soon-to-be ex. The person who makes the most money usually pays alimony when ordered.

In Florida, there are four types of alimony. These include:

  • Permanent
  • Durational
  • Bridge-the-gap
  • Rehabilitative

Is there an alimony payment formula for Florida divorces?

All divorce cases are different, but a few guidelines typically apply. In Florida, alimony is often, but not always, based on the length of the marriage. Courts usually label marriages lasting less than seven years as short-term. Moderate-term unions fall between 7 and 17 years, and long-term marriages are 18 years or more.

In most Florida divorce cases, people who seek alimony after a short-term marriage get a bridge-the-gap or rehabilitative payment schedule. Except in the rarest of circumstances, these payments don’t last longer than the marriage did. For example, Florida courts likely won’t grant you more than three years of alimony if you were only married for three years.

Most alimony recipients exiting moderate-term marriages receive durational alimony, meaning they receive payments based on their marriage’s duration. Divorcees of long-term marriages are most likely to receive permanent alimony. In rare cases, people in moderate-term unions can also argue for permanent payments.

Whether you’re exiting a short-, medium- or long-term marriage, understanding your rights and state laws may go a long way in securing a better alimony payment schedule for yourself. Whether your stand to receive or pay alimony, you want to make sure your divorce settlement includes a fair agreement.