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Handling complex divorce and family law cases in the Tampa Bay Area, including, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Tampa, and New Port Richey
Handling complex divorce and family law cases in the Tampa Bay Area, including, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Tampa, and New Port Richey

Can you change a parenting plan?

On Behalf of | May 25, 2021 | Parenting Agreements |

A parenting plan that worked several months ago might not work for you now. In the state of Florida, you have the option to change your parenting plan. However, you can’t change the plan any time without consulting a judge first.

How do you change your parenting plan?

When it comes to plans and child support, you can’t make decisions without talking to a judge. Otherwise, your former spouse might accuse you of disobeying the judge’s orders. You’ll need to show the judge that you have a legitimate reason for requesting a new parenting plan.

For example, you might need to revise your parenting plan if you get a new job that doesn’t work with your current schedule or experience a sudden change in your routine. You’ll have to show the judge that the change is so severe that you can’t stick with the current parenting plan. Additionally, you might have to prove that the current schedule is having a negative effect on your child–otherwise, the judge might think that you’re merely inconvenienced by the current schedule.

Once you present your case, the judge might reject your request for a new parenting plan. However, if they accept your request, you can adjust to the new plan without worrying about legal challenges from your former spouse. In any case, most judges try to act in the child’s best interests.

How do you prove that you need a parenting plan adjustment?

You might want to talk to an attorney about what the judge could expect from you. If you’re dealing with unexpected circumstances, you might need evidence that shows how much the situation has affected your life. It’s also important to emphasize the situation’s effect on your child so the judge doesn’t think that you’re putting your needs first.