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Handling complex divorce and family law cases in the Tampa Bay Area, including, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Tampa, and New Port Richey
Handling complex divorce and family law cases in the Tampa Bay Area, including, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Tampa, and New Port Richey

How do parents plan out visitation schedules?

On Behalf of | Dec 22, 2020 | Parenting Agreements |

Parents may find that divorce proceedings and resultant decisions create additional responsibilities. Child custody determinations may provide rules regarding visitations, and Florida parents may be willing to work amicably with one another to ensure everyone follows the visitation rules. However, the rules and decisions won’t likely micromanage joint custody visitation planning. So, parents may need to put additional effort into the necessary planning.

Focusing on what’s important

Putting the child’s needs above the parents might be the better approach when devising a visitation schedule. Planning visitations around the parents’ convenience may send the wrong message to the young one. However, work and other essential duties might take precedence since earning an income while following recommended health care requirements could put a parent on better footing to support the child.

Kids also have their schedules

Parents may help their children in many ways by looking at the young ones’ schedules. Visitations that take a child away from swimming lessons, little league or other activities with friends might cause unintended harm. Parents who communicate with their children may discover how important certain hobbies and activities are. A child who takes up a sport or another pursuit at a very young age could become a professional in that field one day.

Fights, bickering and pettiness have no place in planning

While a divorce may become final, the problems and bitter feelings preceding the dissolution might remain. Parents could cause their children problems if visitation planning becomes an exercise in acting out against one another. Everyone might end up better off if the child’s needs came first, but one or both parents may not put the child first. If one parent causes problems, the other parent may choose to return to court to address matters.

Parenting plans and child support issues could continue after the divorce. Hopefully, all involved work to the benefit of the child. If things go wrong, speaking with an attorney may prove worthwhile.